Grandkids: Good for your soul, bad for your tailbone

by Roz Warren
Posted 10/28/21

At 66, I am a big believer in being grateful for what I’ve got rather than dwelling on what I don’t have. For instance, the first thing I do when I wake up each day is shout out loud, “It’s a day! Hurrah! Yippee! I’ve got a day!”

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Grandkids: Good for your soul, bad for your tailbone

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At 66, I am a big believer in being grateful for what I’ve got rather than dwelling on what I don’t have. For instance, the first thing I do when I wake up each day is shout out loud, “It’s a day! Hurrah! Yippee! I’ve got a day!”

After which I usually add, “I sure hope that I’ll get a whole day!”

So far, so good.

The fact that I live alone makes this practice easier, of course. Back when I had a boyfriend, I couldn’t start the day by shouting. That would be rude. The fact that I can currently wake up and shout all I want is a silver lining.

I’m one of those people who find silver linings. Every morning, I pause to savor the fact that God or luck or the universe has granted me a brand new day to enjoy.

And I do enjoy my days. I’m old enough to realize that even a day filled with running errands or dental work is a day to be grateful for. And grateful is what I am. I know too many people who didn’t get to make it to 66. I am happy to have done so. With any luck, I’ll make it to 67 and beyond.

It’s also true that after celebrating the fact that I have been gifted with another day, I’ll usually lie in bed and ask myself, “What hurts?” I know I’m not the only senior citizen who takes a quick survey of their aches and pains each morning.

Just in case you’re wondering, the current answer to that question is: (1) My right shoulder aches from carrying around my 23-pound, 1-year-old baby grandson. (2) My tailbone has hurt ever since I shot down the slide three weeks ago with my 3-year-old grandson in my lap, slid off the end and landed — blam! — on the ground, right on my poor tailbone. (He loved that and wanted to do it again.) (3) I had a tooth pulled months ago, but the gap where it used to be continues to ache, even though the tooth is gone. (Why? I have no idea. I’m a retired librarian, not a dentist.)

Once I’ve cataloged my aches and pains, I go downstairs and make myself a cup of coffee, a small daily blessing that I never fail to appreciate. The first cup of coffee of the day makes life worthwhile.

So do a lot of other things. I lead a quiet existence, and the days are packed with simple pleasures. Writing an essay. Playing the piano. Working with my clients as a writing coach. Walking to my sister’s house for a visit. Enjoying a swim. And the best blessing of all? Grandchildren!

When I was a child, I woke up happy, took the many days ahead of me for granted and suffered no aches and pains. I bounced out of bed with a smile each morning, ready to enjoy my day.

At some point, though, it occurs to you that the days ahead aren’t endless, and if you have any sense, you begin to be grateful for each one. When I think about my life, I don’t dwell on the fact that I have a chronic illness or that I’m slowly going deaf or that a relationship I thought would last forever instead was kaput after just two decades.

The only thing that matters is that I’ve got a day! And I’m going to enjoy it.

Roz Warren is a local non-practicing lawyer, retired librarian after 21 years and author whose slice-of-life essays have appeared in numerous newspapers and websites.

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